PhD opportunities

In addition to the following available PhD projects, there are other PhD research opportunities available within the NEDDS research group. Please contact Dr. David Moran for further information.

Available PhD projects:

Title: New doping processes for diamond for electronic, sensing and quantum applications”

Supervisor: Dr. David Moran
Contact email: David.Moran@glasgow.ac.uk

Description
Diamond possesses a range of amazing properties that make it an exciting new material system for use in a range of electronic, sensing and quantum applications. Some of these properties include high electron charge mobility to make extremely fast switching devices, the ability to tolerate very high voltages, extremely high thermal conductivity, radiation hardness, biocompatibility for bioelectronic devices, a range of quantum point defects for quantum computing and single photon applications and superconductivity at cryogenic temperatures.

This PhD project is joint between the Schools of Engineering and Chemistry and will focus on developing new processes to dope diamond to unlock its electronic potential as a high performance semiconductor. This will involve hands on processing of diamond material in the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (http://www.jwnc.gla.ac.uk) combined with the use of various spectroscopy and analytical techniques to characterize the electrical, chemical and physical properties of the diamond.

This project is ideally suited to students with a background in chemistry or physics though would also be appropriate for electrical engineering students with a good knowledge in the area of semiconductors.

 

Title: Development of nano-scale diamond electronic devices for future space technologies

Supervisor: Dr. David Moran
Contact email: David.Moran@glasgow.ac.uk

Description
Diamond is a fantastic material system for use in many cutting edge applications, including future generation high performance electronic components. The unique properties of diamond deem it ideal for the development of robust electronic systems for operation in extreme and hazardous environments such as for future satellite technologies, extra-terrestrial planetary exploration and long-haul space missions.

The student on this PhD project will work with high quality diamond material to develop stable electronic devices to meet the performance requirements of these space-based applications. This will involve working in the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (http://www.jwnc.gla.ac.uk) to create and test the diamond devices. The student will gain experience in Nanotechnology and a range of nanofabrication and testing techniques as part of this process to reduce the devices to as small a size as possible to improve their operation and performance. Further information on the diamond nano-device work undertaken within the JWNC is described in the following media coverage: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-18273712

Students applying for this project should ideally possess a degree or equivalent in Electronic Engineering, Physics or Chemistry and have some background understanding in solid state physics and/or semiconductor devices.

 

Title: Diamond nano-mechanical resonant systems for sensing and material analysis”

Supervisor: Dr. David Moran
Contact email: David.Moran@glasgow.ac.uk

Description
The various extreme properties of diamond (such as its extremely high Young’s modulus) make it an ideal material for the production of many types of mechanical systems. Nano-scale diamond based resonant systems in particular should be able to achieve higher operating frequencies than other materials and can operate in extreme environments, e.g. at very high temperatures. This makes diamond of great interest for a range of sensing applications including ultra-fine mass measurement and the characterisation of the very high frequency materials’ mechanical properties.

The student on this PhD project will work on the development, design and fabrication of advanced nano and micro-scale devices using high quality diamond material. This will involve working with the Nano-electronic Diamond Devices and Systems group (http://nedds.co.uk/) and in the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (http://www.jwnc.gla.ac.uk) to create and test the diamond devices. The student will gain experience in Nanotechnology and a range of nanofabrication and testing techniques as part of this process and benefit from a variety of highly supportive research environments existing at the University of Glasgow. The multidisciplinary nature of the research project will also provide the student with the opportunity to build up an outstanding academic curriculum vitae with significant experience in the fields of Engineering, Biomedical-Engineering and Bio-Physics.